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Publications

  • Rebirth of Antiquity: Numismatics, Archaeology, and Classical Studies in the Culture of the Renaissance

    The proceedings ofThe Rebirth of Antiquity symposium were published as the Winter 2008 issue of the Princeton University Library Chronicleand also as a separate hardbound volume that is available for $20 (plus $2.50 for postage) from the Friends of Princeton University Library, One Washington Road, Princeton, NJ 08544.  Inquiries can made  to Linda Oliveira at loliveir@princeton.edu or at  (609) 258-3155. 

  • A Catalogue of the Junius Spencer Morgan Collection of Virgil in the Princeton University Library

    The Junius Spencer Morgan collection at Princeton University consists of over 700 titles (totaling around 900 volumes) of editions of the Roman poet Virgil (70-19 BC), in Latin and in various vernacular languages. Technically the collection includes items ranging from the first printed edition (Rome, 1469) to the present, but the focus is strongly on material published in the early modern period.

  • Liberty & the American Revolution : selections from the collection of Sid Lapidus, class of 1959 : an exhibition catalogue

    With a preface by Stephen Ferguson, a foreword by Sid Lapidus, and with an introduction by Sean Wilentz.

  • To the Mountains of the Moon

    Benefiting primarily from the 19th‑century efforts of British, French, and German explorers, most of the general mapping of Africa took place between the founding of the African Association in 1788 and the Berlin Conference of 1884-1885, the start of the “Scramble for Africa” by colonial powers—a span of roughly one hundred years. European exploration of Africa sought several geographic prizes, among which were to reach the fabled city of Timbuktu, to navigate the entire length of the Niger River (Did it evaporate in the desert or flow as a tributary of the Nile?

  • Invention and Early Spread of European Printing as Represented in the Scheide Library

    This volume provides an introduction to the earliest European printing, with beautiful full-color illustrations held in the collection of Princeton University’s Scheide library. It includes an essay on the early history of European printing and a checklist of printing in the Scheide Library pre-dating 1468, arranged chronologically under printing places. Unique copies are noted, as is printing on vellum; the date of acquisition and source of each item is given.

  • The Leonard L. Milberg Irish Theater Collection.

     Compiled and with a preface by J. Howard Woolmer, an introduction by Wes Davis, and biographical essays by Rebecca Berne and Megan Quigley describing the 82 playwrights represented in the collection. Edited by John L. Logan.

  • Unseen Hands: Women Printers, Binders, and Book Designers

    This exhibition and accompanying catalog were inspired by the discovery that Princeton University Library is a rich, if heretofore little-known, repository of examples of women’s contributions to the arts of the book. A sense that recognition and celebration of the legacy of women in printing – particularly as revealed in these materials – was long overdue resulted in an exhibition in the Leonard L. Milberg Gallery for the Graphic Arts that would focus attention on some of the most historically significant and beautifully made examples of works printed, bound, and designed by women.

  • Of Maps and Men: In Pursuit of a Northwest Passage

    The Canadian Arctic (including Hudson Bay) occupies an area of approximately one million square miles of glaciated plain, tundra, islands, sounds, straits, inlets, and passages, which are frozen and choked with ice floes and pack ice for much of the year. For 400 years explorers sought a navigable passage through its archipelago or across its land.

  • The Bible in English: Before and After the Hampton Court Conference, 1604

    On May 1, 2004, the Princeton University Library opened an exhibition marking the 400th anniversary of an important event in the history of the English Bible. In 1604, English bishops, Puritan leaders and other churchmen convened by James I gathered at Hampton Court Palace for the purpose of determining "things pretended to be amiss in the church." One result was the renowned King James Bible, first published seven years later. For more than two and a half centuries following no other authorized translation was made.

  • Lewis Carroll, Photographer: The Princeton University Library Albums

    Long before he published Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson ("Lewis Carroll" to the world) took up photography as a hobby. Unlike most of the other amateurs in his circle, he persevered to become a dedicated, prolific, and remarkably gifted photographer, creating approximately 3,000 images during his twenty-five years of photographic activity. This handsomely designed volume makes clear the remarkable extent and complexity of Carroll's photographic art.

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