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Publications

  • The Leonard L. Milberg Collection of Jewish American Writers

    Compiled by J. Howard Woolmer.  Edited by John L. Logan.  Illustrated with numerous portraits. 2 volumes.

    This catalog describes the collection of books by Jewish American Writers built for the Princeton University Library by Leonard Milberg, beginning in 1999. The year 1800 was chosen as the date for the start of this collection. Yiddish titles have been transliterated. Vol. 2 includes writers from Denise Levertov to Louis Zukofsky. 

  • College as it is, or, The collegian's manual in 1853

    In 1853, just a few years before the outbreak of the Civil War, two seniors at the College of New Jersey (later Princeton University) wrote an account of what it was like to be an undergraduate at an institution that prided itself on attracting students from every section of the nation. Their report is one of very few to provide vivid descriptions of student life from the point of view of students themselves.

  • The Leonard L. Milberg Collection of American Poetry

    Compiled by J. Howard Woolmer. With Biographical Essays by Molly Weigel.

  • Origins of the School for Scandal: “The Slanderers”; “Sir Peter Teazle”

    The two playlets by Richard Brinsley Sheridan reproduced here, “The Slanderers” and “Sir Peter Teazle,” preserve in its “seminal state” the finest English comedy of the 18th century. They are preserved at the Princeton University Library in the Richard Brinsley Sheridan archive within the Robert H. Taylor Collection, which arrived at Princeton in 1971 and continued to grow. After Mr. Taylor’s purchase in 1982 from Bernard Quaritch, Ltd.

  • European Graphic Arts: The Art of the Book from Gutenberg to Picasso

    This beautifully illustrated catalogue and the exhibition of treasures which it records is presented in honor of Richard M. Ludwig on the occasion of his retirement as a member of the Princeton English faculty and as Associate University Librarian for Rare Books and Special Collections. It celebrates that part of his career in which pedagogic, scholarly, and administrative talents were blended to enhance for students, scholars, and staff the joys of both the collecting and the use of Princeton collections of fine and rare research materials. Over 100 illustrations, some in full-color.

  • Thomas Mann 1875-1955

    Publication issued to accompany the 1975 exhibition celebrating Mann's centenary. Essays by Stanley Corngold, Victor Lange and Theodore Ziolkowski. Preface by Richard M. Ludwig

  • Father Bombo’s Pilgrimage to Mecca, 1770

    This book was written in 1770, and might thus plausibly claim the distinction of being the “first American novel.” It is an early work of two men who later came to rank among the most important literary figures of the American Revolution and early Republic. Hugh Henry Brackenridge (1748-1816) was a distinguished Pennsylvania jurist and politician. Philip Freneau (1752-1832) was the author of anti-British satires during the Revolution, and an anti-Federalist editor working for Jefferson in the early 1790s.

  • Early American Book Illustrators and Wood Engravers: 1670-1870: A Catalogue of a Collection of American Books, Illustrated for the most part with woodcuts and wood engravings in the Princeton University Library.

    Essential reference book for the study of American book illustration. Includes reproductions of 124 early American illustrations.  Volume one published in 1958.  Supplement issued in 1968.

    Selected in 1959 as one the Fifty Books of the Year by the AIGA (American Institute of Graphic Arts). Designed by P. J. Conkwright.

  • Oscar Wilde: A Writer for the Nineties: Exhibition Catalogue

    Catalogue of an Exhibition at the Princeton Univ. Library in 1995. The 1890s in Great Britain were characterized by endings and beginnings, traditionalism and iconoclasm, decadence and regeneration. At the center of it all stood Oscar Wilde, whose work and life made him the embodiment of his contradictory age. Born in Dublin in 1854, Wilde became an Irishman who conquered England, a Protestant who loved Catholicism, a married man who loved other men, a socialist who courted West End audiences, and a romantic in an age of realism.

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