American History/20th Century

Collections with Divisional Holdings

  • Woodrow Wilson Collection

    The Woodrow Wilson Collection consists of Wilson holdings which have been acquired by the Princeton University Library Department of Rare Books and Special Collections gradually over many years by purchase and gifts from many sources. The collection is rich in material prior to Wilson's presidential years, although it is not limited to this period; researchers will find materials documenting both the public and private life of Woodrow Wilson.

  • Dwight D. Eisenhower White House Press Releases

    The Dwight D. Eisenhower White House Press Releases were compiled by McPhee and are composed of press releases issued by White House press secretary James C. Hagerty of the text for speeches by President Eisenhower and members of his staff at events and regarding his domestic and foreign policies.

  • Harold R. Medina papers

    This collection includes legal records, personal and professional correspondence, photographs, audio recordings, and teaching materials; in aggregate, they offer a substantial record of Medina's life and work. The bulk of the records in this collection is legal records, collected by Medina at a time when such resources were not widely distributed. They provide an almost-comprehensive record of Medina's career as a lawyer and judge.Correspondence is usually kept in chronological rather than subject order.

  • Joshua Butler Wright Papers

    Consists of selected papers of Wright documenting his diplomatic career. ‡b Included are 16 diaries spanning the years 1909-1918, 1927-1928, 1931-1932, and 1936; some correspondence; a scrapbook on the Rogers Act of 1922 concerning the reorganization of the foreign service; and a document on the German-Czechoslovakian crisis of 1938.

  • Political Cartoon Collection

    This artificial collection consists of one thousand original drawings, including
    a significant number by Charles Lewis Bartholomew, Otho Cushing, Homer C.
    Davenport, John Tinney McCutcheon, and Frank Arthur Nankivell. Other artists
    that are well represented include Louis Glackens, Harold Imbrie, Udo J. Keppler,
    Norman Ritchie, and Fred O. Seibel.

  • Bernard M. Baruch Papers

    This collection consists consists primarily of public papers relating to Baruch's various involvements in government affairs. It includes several runs of office correspondence as well as a small amount of personal correspondence. Among the Political Activities documented in this collection are his involvement in the War Industries Board, the American Commission to Negotiate Peace, the Council of National Defense, the National Industrial Conference, the Saratoga Springs Commission, the Rubber Survey Committee, the War and Post-War Adjustment Unit of the U.S.

  • Woodrow Wilson Additional Papers

    The Woodrow Wilson Additional Papers consist of materials that the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library has acquired on Woodrow Wilson since the mid-1990s through donations. Materials include correspondence, photographs, programs, published materials and other assorted items.

  • Dwight D. Eisenhower White House photographs

    Consists of White House photographs (1950-1960) that are mainly of President Eisenhower on various public occasions. In a number of photographs he is shown together with his family, John Foster Dulles, and other statesmen.

  • Harold Gardiner Bowen Papers

    Consists of selected papers of Vice-Admiral Bowen including speeches, articles, documents, printed matter, and manuscripts for his book Ships, Machinery, and Mossbacks, The Autobiography of a Naval Engineer (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1954). The papers primarily refer to his various activities as director of the Naval Research Laboratory (1939-1942), special assistant to the Secretary of the Navy (1939-1947), chief of the Office of Naval Research (1946-1947), and executive secretary of the Thomas Alva Edison Foundation.

  • Joseph A. Robinson Papers

    Robinson was involved in the establishment of informational and cultural affairs agencies in India, Saigon and Warsaw, and in his letters describes both the internal politics and external challenges of establishing an American news presence abroad. Robinson's account of the creation of the Saigon office is especially thorough.At the beginning of the correspondence run, Robinson has just been offered a position in the Office of the Coordinator of Information.

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