Princeton University History

Collections with Divisional Holdings

  • Don Oberdorfer Papers on Princeton University: The First 250 Years

    Consists of notes and photocopies of articles used as research materials for PRINCETON UNIVERSITY: THE FIRST 250 YEARS (1995). Included in the collection is a transcript of an interview with former president William G. Bowen, and a 1994 administrative and academic self-study of the University.

  • University Land Records

    The University Land Records consist of deeds, mortgages, bonds, other legal papers, and maps concerning the acquisition, disposition, or description of University properties. Most of the papers are original though some photocopies are present.

  • John Rupert Martin Papers

    Consists of Martin's correspondence and his handwritten lecture notes from courses taught as well as his lecture appointments at other institutions. Much of the correspondence is with fellow art historians and deals with scholarly matters, including one letter from Irwin Panofsky.

  • Roy Heath Class of 1954 Advisee Project Interviews

    The collection comprises materials related to a study that Heath, a clinical psychologist, conducted on 36 members of the Class of 1954 during their years at Princeton. Most of the documents are transcriptions of interviews Heath conducted with the students on a regular basis. The students are coded by number, but Heath provided a list to enable individuals to be identified once the collection is opened in 2035.

  • Princeton in Africa Records

    Consists of newsletters, bulletins, invitations to annual benefit, publications, news
    releases, promotional materials, and fundraising materials.

  • Dean Mathey Papers

    The collection documents Mathey's familial relationships, service to Princeton, tennis career, and other activities from his undergraduate days to the end of his life. The collection includes correspondence relating to Mathey's undergraduate career, his time as 1st Lieutenant with the American Expeditionary Force, his service as a member of Princeton's Board of Trustees, and personal correspondence from Mathey and his wife Gertrude to their sons.

  • H. Hubert Wilson Collection on the Princeton University Department of Politics

    The collection consists primarily of published sources on topics of interest to Wilson, including the administration, finances and governance of Princeton University, the activities of the Priorities Committee, government ties and sponsored research at Princeton, ROTC, and campus politics. It also contains materials originating in Wilson's teaching at Princeton, including student papers and theses, as well as drafts of a publication titled \This Isn't Princeton\.

  • Princeton University Class Records

    The Class Records consist of a diverse set of materials documenting the history and activities of Princeton University classes during their time as undergraduates and as alumni. In the collection are correspondence, newsletters, publications, photographs, and memorabilia, all of which pertain to a particular Princeton University graduating class and its members.The most common type of material in the collection is class secretary records consisting of correspondence to individual classmates.

  • Office of the President Records: Shirley Tilghman Subgroup

    The Office of the President Records, Shirley Tilghman Subgroup documents the
    administration of Princeton's 19th president, Shirley Tilghman, through
    correspondence, memoranda, press releases, and other materials. Also present are
    records documenting Tilghman’s interactions with students, faculty, staff, and
    various academic departments.Please see series descriptions in contents list for additional information about
    individual series.

  • Bureau of Student Placement records

    Consists of army, navy, and marine corps plans for colleges, card files containing information about students in the service, and the correspondence of director Gordon G. Sikes which includes letters to and from servicemen, military officials, and other University administrators.

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