Princeton University History

Collections with Divisional Holdings

  • Albert Mendeloff Papers on the Princeton Camera Club

    Consists of correspondence between Albert Mendelhoff and famous photographers of 1938 in regards to a potential exhibit of loaned photographs at the Art and Archaeology Department.

  • Nassau Hall Iconography

    The first is a rendering of Nassau Hall by Dawkins, from New American Magazine, published in 1760, four years after the building was completed. This building was later seriously damaged during the American Revolution. Paintings by Peale, Polk and Trumbull depicting George Washington and the Battle of Princeton have Nassau Hall in the backdrop, thus reminding the viewer of Princeton's contribution to the Revolutionary cause and its subsequent sufferings.Nassau Hall was severely damaged by fire several times in the course of the nineteenth century.

  • University Research Board Records

    Consists of University Research Board meeting minutes, annual reports, correspondence between members, and some subject files, as well as the memos and correspondence of Raymond J. Woodrow, executive officer and secretary of the Committee on Project Research and Invention. Much of Woodrow's material pertains to University sponsored research in support of WWII efforts.

  • School of Architecture Records

    Consists of the records of the School of Architecture and its related research units,
    the Bureau of Urban Research and its successor, the Research Center for Urban and
    Environmental Planning. Includes subject files, correspondence, course descriptions,
    published and unpublished studies produced by the School on subjects such as land
    use; and financial records of the department, faculty minutes, course descriptions,

  • Kenneth S. Clark Papers

    Consists of the personal papers and music of Kenneth Sherman Clark spanning his time
    at Princeton as well as his later career. Included are correspondence, royalty
    contracts, scrapbooks, photographs, articles, and sheet music, both handwritten and
    published copies of Clark’s own songs, along with a selection of Princeton-related
    songs written by others.

  • Department of French and Italian Records

    Consists of the records of the contemporary Department of French and Italian, collected while it was operating as the Department of Modern Languages and later the Department of Romance Languages and Literature. Materials include notes from departmental committee meetings, departmental minutes, course descriptions, departmental examinations, correspondence, and files about French-language Peace Corps training and study abroad programs run through the department.

  • Princeton University Commencement Records

    Consists of programs, bulletins, announcements, and newspaper clippings which
    document Princeton University commencement activities from 1748 to the present.
    Generally, files are arranged chronologically by year. In addition there are separate
    series consisting of bound programs, electrical broadcast transcriptions, bound
    commencement notices, oversize material, and audio recodings of various commencement,

  • Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Records

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Records document the people, projects,
    events, activities and physical grounds of the laboratory through a span of 49
    years. The records include one binder of digitized historical negatives and four
    binders, one box of PPPL Communications Office Publications, and three boxes of
    materials from the office of Dr. Earl C. Tanner, a long-term employee of the

  • Historical Photograph Collection: Glass-Plate Negatives Series

    Consists of approximately 135 glass plate negatives and prints containing images of
    Princeton University, primarily of the campus and buildings.

  • China Famine Relief Fund records

    Consists of financial records, receipts for gifts made to the fund, announcements, staff lists, and correspondence with other organizations working towards famine relief in China.

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