World War I

Collections with Divisional Holdings

  • Clinton A. Decker Papers

    This collection contains personal and business correspondence and photographs of Clinton A. Decker. The majority of personal correspondence is to Decker's future wife, Gertrude V. O'Brien. The letters, arranged chronologically, describe Decker's activities as a member of the American Advisory Commission of Railway Experts to Russia and reveal Decker's perspective on revolutionary Russia from 1917 to 1919.

  • Clifford Nickles Carver Papers

    Consists primarily of correspondence relating to the work of Carver (Princeton Class of 1913) as secretary (1914-1915) to Walter H. Page, the American ambassador in London, as secretary (1915) to Edward Mandell House in Europe, and as assistant to Bernard M. Baruch working for the War Industries Board, and to his commission in the U.S. Navy attached to the Office of Naval Intelligence (1917-1918).

  • Bernard M. Baruch Papers

    This collection consists consists primarily of public papers relating to Baruch's various involvements in government affairs. It includes several runs of office correspondence as well as a small amount of personal correspondence. Among the Political Activities documented in this collection are his involvement in the War Industries Board, the American Commission to Negotiate Peace, the Council of National Defense, the National Industrial Conference, the Saratoga Springs Commission, the Rubber Survey Committee, the War and Post-War Adjustment Unit of the U.S.

  • Bernard Flexner Papers

    Contains the personal papers of Flexner, including diaries and letters to his sister Mary while he served with the American Red Cross Commission to Romania (1917) and as counsel for the Zionist delegation to the Paris Peace Conference (1918-1919); material concerning Albert Einstein, Franklin D.

  • Barr Ferree collection

    Consists of two groups of material collected by Ferree: 1) copies of government reports, resolutions, proclamations, statements, and clippings concerning foreign relations, the entry of the United States into World War I, and other varied issues during the administration of Woodrow Wilson. Included are replies to Ferree's requests from the president's secretary, Joseph P. Tumulty.

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